The relationship of neuroticism and urgency to negative consequences of alcohol use in women with bulimic symptoms

Sarah Fischer, Gregory T. Smith, Agnes Annus, Megan Hendricks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test hypotheses regarding why eating disordered college women report more frequent negative consequences of alcohol use than controls. Thirty-two women with eating disorder (ED) symptoms and 34 women without eating disorder symptom were individually administered structured clinical interviews regarding alcohol abuse/dependence and the eating disorders examination. They also completed self-report measures of neuroticism, urgency, sensation seeking, planning, and persistence. Women with ED symptoms reported more negative consequences of alcohol use, and higher levels of neuroticism and urgency. However, the two groups did not differ on any other personality variable. The presence of high levels of trait urgency moderated the effect of neuroticism on the negative consequences of drinking such that women with high levels of both traits reported the most consequences related to alcohol use. Rash affect regulation may be a characteristic of ED women and influence consequences of alcohol use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1199-1209
Number of pages11
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by NIAAA grant number 5F3-1AA014469-02 to Sarah Fischer.

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Bulimia
  • Impulsivity
  • Neuroticism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Psychology

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