The role of family of origin food-related experiences in bulimic symptomatology

Elizabeth K. MacBrayer, Gregory T. Smith, Denis M. McCarthy, Stacy Demos, Jean Simmons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: With the goal of developing a model relating family of origin experiences to maladaptive cognitions to bulimic symptom formation, the authors developed a measure of family of origin food-related experiences called the Family History Inventory. Method: A number (N = 662) of sixth to eighth-grade adolescents completed the inventory, eating and dieting expectancy measures, and the Bulimia Test-Revised (BULIT-R). Results: Fourteen scales were identified in the inventory. They emphasized family teasing about weight, negative maternal modeling regarding food, and family rules concerning eating. Eleven of the 14 scales correlated with the BULIT-R. Two superordinate factors called Family Teasing and Negative Maternal Modeling summarized 8 of the 14 subscales. Statistical tests were consistent with the hypothesis that eating and dieting expectancies mediate the influence of Family Teasing and Negative Maternal Modeling on bulimic symptomatology. Discussion: There was good evidence for the validity of the Family History Inventory. The theoretical implications of the mediation tests are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-160
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Etiology
  • Family of origin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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