The roles of spirituality in the relationship between traumatic life events, mental health, and drug use among African American women from one Southern State

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26 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the role of spirituality as a moderator of the relationship between traumatic life experiences, mental health, and drug use in a sample of African American women. It was hypothesized that there would be an inverse relationship overall between spirituality and mental health and drug use among this sample of African American women. Secondly, was expected that spirituality would moderate the relationship between traumatic life events and mental health and drug use. African American women (n = 206) were recruited from the community and from probation officers in three urban areas of a southern state, and face-to-face interviews were completed. Findings indicated that there was a main effect for spirituality (as measured by existential well-being on the Spiritual Well-Being Scale) and traumatic life events, mental health, and alcohol use. In addition, spirituality was a significant moderator of the relationship between traumatic life events and cocaine use. Discussion and implications for African American women are included.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1246-1257
Number of pages12
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume48
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
an Assistant Professor in the Department of Behavioral Science with an appointment in the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research at the University of Kentucky. Dr. Duvall currently serves as a Coinvestigator and the Study Director for the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) funded Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies-2 grant at the University of Kentucky. Dr. Duvall has published over 25 articles in peer-reviewed journals on various aspects of criminal justice involvement and substance use as they pertain to factors such as employment, peer relations, health services utilization, and sexual risk behavior.

Funding Information:
This project was supported by NIDA R01DA022967, NIDA K08-DA032296) and K01 Grant #:K01-DA021309, PI: Oser.

Keywords

  • African American women
  • Drug use
  • Mental health
  • Religiosity
  • Spirituality
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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