The segue stellar parameter pipeline. III. Comparison with high-resolution spectroscopy of SDSS/SEGUE field stars

Carlos Allende Prieto, Thirupathi Sivarani, Timothy C. Beers, Young Sun Lee, Lars Koesterke, Matthew Shetrone, Christopher Sneden, David L. Lambert, Ronald Wilhelm, Constance M. Rockosi, David K. Lai, Brian Yanny, Inese I. Ivans, Jennifer A. Johnson, Wako Aoki, Coryn A.L. Bailer-Jones, Paola Re Fiorentin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

212 Scopus citations

Abstract

We report high-resolution spectroscopy of 125 field stars previously observed as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and its program for Galactic studies, the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). These spectra are used to measure radial velocities and to derive atmospheric parameters, which we compare with those reported by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP). The SSPP obtains estimates of these quantities based on SDSS ugriz photometry and low-resolution (R 2000) spectroscopy. For F- and G-type stars observed with high signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns), we empirically determine the typical random uncertainties in the radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities delivered by the SSPP to be 2.4 km s-1, 130 K (2.2 %), 0.21 dex, and 0.11 dex, respectively, with systematic uncertainties of a similar magnitude in the effective temperatures and metallicities. We estimate random errors for lower S/N based on numerical simulations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2070-2082
Number of pages13
JournalAstronomical Journal
Volume136
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

Keywords

  • Methods: data analysis
  • Stars: abundances
  • Stars: fundamental parameters
  • Surveys
  • Techniques: spectroscopic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

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