The short-term effects of air pollutants on respiratory disease mortality in Wuhan, China: Comparison of time-series and case-crossover analyses

Meng Ren, Na Li, Zhan Wang, Yisi Liu, Xi Chen, Yuanyuan Chu, Xiangyu Li, Zhongmin Zhu, Liqiao Tian, Hao Xiang

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60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Few studies have compared different methods when exploring the short-term effects of air pollutants on respiratory disease mortality in Wuhan, China. This study assesses the association between air pollutants and respiratory disease mortality with both time-series and time-stratified-case-crossover designs. The generalized additive model (GAM) and the conditional logistic regression model were used to assess the short-term effects of air pollutants on respiratory disease mortality. Stratified analyses were performed by age, sex, and diseases. A 10 μg/m 3 increment in SO 2 level was associated with an increase in relative risk for all respiratory disease mortality of 2.4% and 1.9% in the case-crossover and time-series analyses in single pollutant models, respectively. Strong evidence of an association between NO 2 and daily respiratory disease mortality among men or people older than 65 years was found in the case-crossover study. There was a positive association between air pollutants and respiratory disease mortality in Wuhan, China. Both time-series and case-crossover analyses consistently reveal the association between three air pollutants and respiratory disease mortality. The estimates of association between air pollution and respiratory disease mortality from the case-crossover analysis displayed greater variation than that from the time-series analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number40482
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 13 2017

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© The Author(s) 2017.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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