The Sobering Effects of Jailhouse Informant Testimony on Perceptions of an Intoxicated Rape Victim

Alexis M. Le Grand, Baylee D. Jenkins, Jonathan M. Golding, Jeffrey S. Neuschatz, Andrea M. Pals, Stacy A. Wetmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the impact of jailhouse informant (JI) testimony on mock-jurors’ perceptions of an alcohol-facilitated rape trial. Male and female participants (N=186) read a rape trial summary of an adult female after attending a concert. The trial varied whether the victim was intoxicated or sober and whether a JI testified that the defendant confessed to the rape. The results indicated that participants were more pro-victim (e.g., voted guilty more) when the JI testified than no JI testimony, and that women were more pro-victim than men. Although victim intoxication negatively impacted perceptions of the defendant, it did not influence verdicts. The results are discussed concerning the legal implications of presenting JI testimony and factors that influence perceptions of rape victims.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-212
Number of pages18
JournalBasic and Applied Social Psychology
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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