The social networks of high and low self-monitors: Implications for workplace performance

Ajay Mehra, Martin Kilduff, Daniel J. Brass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

795 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article examines how different personality types create and benefit from social networks in organizations. Using data from a 116-member high-technology firm, we tested how self-monitoring orientation and network position related to work performance. First, chameleon-like high self-monitors were more likely than true-to-themselves low self-monitors to occupy central positions in social networks. Second, for high (but not for low) self-monitors, longer service in the organization related to the occupancy of strategically advantageous network positions. Third, self-monitoring and centrality in social networks independently predicted individuals' workplace performance. The results paint a picture of people shaping the networks that constrain and enable performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-146
Number of pages26
JournalAdministrative Science Quarterly
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The social networks of high and low self-monitors: Implications for workplace performance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this