The social significance of religious resources in the prediction of mattering to others: African American and white contrasts

Robyn Lewis, John Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

The perception of mattering, defined as one's perceived significance to others, is likely influenced by the interpersonal and intrapersonal dimensions of religious faith. Using data from a community study conducted in Miami-Dade County, this study examines whether private and public aspects of religiosity are independently as well as mutually associated with perceptions of mattering, net of secular social resources. We also consider whether the availability of religious and secular resources varies by race/ethnicity, and whether such differences account for race/ethnic differences in perceptions of mattering. Findings demonstrate that private religiosity and membership in a religious organization, in addition to secular social support and integration, are independently associated with perceptions of mattering. Findings also reveal that, compared to Whites, the higher levels of mattering reported by African Americans are largely explained by their higher levels of private religiosity and greater likelihood of belonging to religious organizations and attending religious services.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-294
Number of pages22
JournalSociological Spectrum
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work is supported by grants R01DA13292 and R01DA16429 from The National Institute on Drug Abuse to R. Jay Turner. Address correspondence to Robyn Lewis, Department of Sociology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA. E-mail: rklewis@fsu.edu

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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