“The stress is indescribable”: self-reported health implications from child welfare supervisors

Austin Griffiths, Whitney Harper, Patricia Desrosiers, April Murphy, David Royse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using data from a state-wide survey of frontline supervisors from a state child welfare agency, this study qualitatively examined how stress from their positions may have affected their perceived health. With a response rate of 44%, 117 frontline supervisors participated and provided 240 comments describing health consequences in their physical health, mental health, work-life balance, and development of unhealthy habits or behaviors. Implications from this study are discussed in the context of workplace stress and employee turnover.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-201
Number of pages19
JournalClinical Supervisor
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019, © 2019 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • Health
  • child welfare
  • self-care
  • supervisor
  • turnover

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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