The Value of Freedom of Expression and Information on Countries’ Human Rights Performance: A Cross-National Longitudinal Study

Aimei Yang, Rong Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study explores the influence of communication variables on human rights protection. The effects of international and domestic mass communication and digital media were assessed among global social, economic, and political factors. The statistical analyses on a sample of 101 nation states over the most recent decade reveal several important findings: (a) top-down, internationally initiated human rights discourse and monitoring were not as effective as bottom-up, domestically initiated human rights dialogues; (b) access to the Internet and access to a mobile phone have different effects on human rights performance, and Internet availability played an especially important role; (c) economic development, political system, and population size are powerful predictors of nations’ human rights performance, but a large population size diminishes the effect of economic development; and (d) economic development can moderate the effect of political context on human rights performance. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)352-376
Number of pages25
JournalMass Communication and Society
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 3 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Mass Communication & Society Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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