Traumatic brain injury in young, amyloid-β peptide overexpressing transgenic mice induces marked ipsilateral hippocampal atrophy and diminished deposition during aging

Yasushi Nakagawa, Michio Nakamura, Tracy K. McIntosh, Amaris Rodriguez, Jesse A. Berlin, Douglas H. Smith, Kathryn E. Saatman, Ramesh Raghupathi, James Clemens, Takaomi C. Saido, M. Luise Schmidt, Virginia M.Y. Lee, John Q. Trojanowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

84 Scopus citations

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an epigenetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). To test the hypothesis that TBI contributes to the onset and/or progression of AD-like β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) deposits, we studied the long-term effects of TBI in transgenic mice that overexpress human Aβ from a mutant Aβ precursor protein (APP) minigene driven by a platelet derived (PD) growth factor promoter (PDAPP mice). TBI was induced in 4-month-old PDAPP and wild type (WT) mice by controlled cortical impact (CCI). Because Aβ begins to deposit progressively in the PDAPP brain by 6 months, we examined WT and PDAPP mice at 2, 5, and 8 months after TBI or sham treatment (i.e., at 6, 9, and 12 months of age). Hippocampal atrophy in the PDAPP mice was more severe ipsilateral versus contralateral to TBI, and immunohistochemical studies with antibodies to different Aβ peptides demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in hippocampus and cingulate cortex Aβ deposits ipsilateral versus contralateral to CCI in 9-12 month-old PDAPP mice. Hippocampal atrophy and reduced Aβ deposits were not seen in hippocampus or cingulate cortex of sham-injured PDAPP mice or in any WT mice. These data suggest that the vulnerability of brain cells to Aβ toxicity increases and that the accumulation of Aβ deposits decrease in the penumbra of CCI months after TBI. Thus, in addition to providing unique opportunities for elucidating genetic mechanisms of AD, transgenic mice that recapitulate AD pathology also may be relevant animal models for investigating the poorly understood role that TBI and other epigenetic risk factors play in the onset and/or progression of AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)390-398
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Comparative Neurology
Volume411
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Amyloid plaques
  • Head trauma
  • Neuron degeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Neuroscience

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