Unpacking the Non-Hispanic Other Category: Differences in Patterns of Tobacco Product Use Among Youth and Adults in the United States, 2009–2018

Delvon T. Mattingly, Jana L. Hirschtick, Nancy L. Fleischer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies investigating patterns of tobacco use by race often aggregate non-Black and non-Hispanic racial minorities into the “Other” category, masking important differences. Pooling 10 years (2009–2018) of National Survey on Drug Use and Health data (n = 52,424), we estimated the prevalence and proportion of individual tobacco product use and patterns of single, dual, and polytobacco use overall and by sex for youth (12–17) and adult (18 +) non-Hispanic Asian, American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN), Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander (NH/PI), and multiracial respondents. Cigarette prevalence was highest among AI/AN youth (8.6%) and adults (37.3%). For youth and adults, the AI/AN subgroup had the highest prevalence of single (9.2% youth, 35.8% adults) and dual (2.8% youth, 6.6% adults) use, followed by multiracial respondents. Furthermore, among tobacco users, AI/AN and multiracial youth and adults had the highest proportions of dual and poly use compared to other races. Appropriate tobacco prevention and cessation interventions should consider variation in tobacco use among non-Hispanic “Other” subgroups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1368-1372
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • Cigarettes
  • Epidemiology
  • Health disparities
  • Polytobacco
  • Tobacco products

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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