Unraveling the viral complex associated with la france disease of the cultivated mushroom, agaricus bisporus

C. P. Romaine, M. M. Goodin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

In 1962, a landmark paper published in Nature (London) describing virus-like particles (VLPs) in diseased mushrooms, Agaricus bisporus, created a new branch of science called mycovirology (fungal virology). Besides setting a precedent for the previously unconsidered notion that a mere fungus could be infected by a virus, it established a new line of research to elucidate the etiologic agent of a devastating malady affecting the mushroom industry. This disorder, which is most commonly referred to as La France disease, was first reported in 1950 by Sinden and Hauser following a severe episode on the La France mushroom operation located in southeastern Pennsylvania. For more than a decade, the cause of La France disease baffled scientists, who had searched endlessly for the presumptive causal bacterium, fungus, or nematode, but to no avail.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationdsRNA Genetic Elements
Subtitle of host publicationConcepts and Applications in Agriculture, Forestry, and Medicine
Pages237-257
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9781420039122
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (all)
  • Engineering (all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (all)

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