Using close range terrestrial digital photogrammetry for 3-D rock slope modeling and discontinuity mapping in the United States

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

134 Scopus citations

Abstract

Close range terrestrial digital photogrammetry has evolved into a useful remote characterization tool for rock slope practitioners, particularly in situations where manual discontinuity measurement may be impractical or dangerous. The primary products are high-resolution 3-D photographic surface models that have several advantages over terrestrial laser scanner point clouds, including cost, equipment portability and the ability to include discontinuities that appear as linear traces rather than flat planar surfaces. Models can be made with currently available off-the-shelf digital cameras while commercially available software provides virtual mapping capabilities that allow practitioners to identify, map, and quickly calculate the orientation of modeled discontinuities using the same experience-based logical process used by traditional fieldworkers. Comparison of manually measured and model-derived discontinuity orientations shows good agreement both between individual discontinuities and entire sets of discontinuities. Application of the technique is illustrated using five recent mining and civil engineering projects in the United States.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)457-469
Number of pages13
JournalBulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment
Volume67
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Computer modeling
  • Photogrammetry
  • Rock mass characterization
  • Rock slope stability
  • Structural geology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Geology

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