Using Social Network Analysis to Measure Social Inclusion for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Valerie Miller, Kelly Leigers, Dana Howell, Patrick Kitzman, M Ault

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this perspective is to describe the theory and practical steps of using principles of social network analysis to help measure the social inclusion of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Social inclusion for those with disabilities has become an important area of focus of rehabilitative professionals in the past decade. Social inclusion is comprised of the domains participation and social interaction. Decreased social inclusion can negatively impact quality of life and health. Individuals with IDD continue to experience barriers to social inclusion such as limited opportunities to socialize and participate in community groups, physical barriers, and the lack of available valued social roles. There are limited methods for measuring social inclusion for individuals with IDD. Social network analysis is one way to analyze and understand social relationships to better understand the social inclusion of individuals with IDD. Providing a way to measure social inclusion may help answer questions about the effectiveness of interventions, ultimately leading to increased social inclusion for individuals with IDD.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPhysical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • Developmental disabilities
  • disability inclusion
  • intellectual disabilities
  • measurement
  • social inclusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Occupational Therapy

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