Utilizing Interview and Self-Report Assessment of the Five-Factor Model to Examine Convergence with the Alternative Model for Personality Disorders

Ashley C. Helle, Timothy J. Trull, Thomas A. Widiger, Stephanie N. Mullins-Sweatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

An alternative model for personality disorders is included in Section III (Emerging Models and Measures) of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, (5th ed.; DSM-5). The DSM-5 dimensional trait model is an extension of the Five-Factor Model (FFM; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) assesses the 5 domains and 25 traits in the alternative model. The current study expands on recent research to examine the relationship of the PID-5 with an interview measure of the FFM. The Structured Interview for the Five Factor Model of Personality (SIFFM) assesses the 5 bipolar domains and 30 facets of the FFM. Research has indicated that the SIFFM captures maladaptive aspects of personality (as well as adaptive). The SIFFM, NEO PI-R, and PID-5 were administered to participants to examine their respective convergent and discriminant validity. Results provide evidence for the convergence of the 2 models using self-report and interview measures of the FFM. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed, particularly a call for the development of a structured interview for the assessment of the DSM-5 dimensional trait model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-254
Number of pages8
JournalPersonality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 American Psychological Association.

Keywords

  • DSM-5 alternative model
  • Five-Factor Model
  • PID-5
  • personality disorders
  • semistructured interview

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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