Vaccination Response of Young Foals to Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin: Evidence of Effective Priming in the Presence of Maternal Antibodies

Tracy L. Sturgill, David W. Horohov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The ability to produce antibodies is essential for protection from infectious disease; however, in the neonate, maternal antibodies have been proposed to interfere with the foal's ability to respond to vaccination. In species other than the equid, keyhole limpet hemocyanin, a high-molecular weight protein, is used in vivo as an experimental vaccine component because of its high intrinsic immunogenicity. In this study, we show that young foals are able to produce a primary antibody response to vaccination at an early age. Thus, foals, like human infants, are capable of responding to antigenic exposure to a novel antigen (keyhole limpet hemocyanin) during the neonatal period. Although vaccinating foals in the presence of maternal antibodies failed to induce a primary serological response, priming occurred as comparable anamnestic responses were detected upon subsequent exposure to the antigen. There was no evidence of tolerance induction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)359-364
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Equine Veterinary Science
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Dr. Sturgill was supported by a fellowship from Fort Dodge Animal Health . The authors acknowledge the technical assistance of Mr. Lynn Ennis, Mr. Gary Thomas, and the staff at Maine Chance Farm. This is publication number 10-14-079 from the University of Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station.

Keywords

  • Equine
  • Maternal Interference
  • Neonate
  • Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Equine

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