Volatile compounds from crabapple (Malus spp.) cultivars differing in susceptibility to the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica newman)

John H. Loughrin, Daniel A. Potter, Thomas R. Hamilton-Kemp, Matthew E. Byers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

The volatile compounds emitted by leaves of four crabapple cultivars susceptible to damage by Japanese beetles and four relatively resistant cultivars were examined. Twelve compounds, mostly terpene hydrocarbons, were identified from intact leaves. The terpenes (E)-β-ocimene, caryophyllene, germacrene D and (E,E)-α-farnesene occurred in significantly higher levels in susceptible cultivars, whereas resistant cultivars produced greater amounts of (E)-4,8-dimethyl 1,3,7-nonatriene and linalool. The relative attractiveness of the cultivars as determined in a pitfall bioassay, however, was not related to their susceptibility to the Japanese beetle as previously determined by defoliation sustained in the field. The attractiveness of individual cultivars was found to be positively correlated with linalool as a percent of the total volatile blend emitted by leaves. This study and previous work suggest that variation in susceptibility of crabapple cultivars to defoliation by Japanese beetles is not due to the attractiveness of the individual cultivars but rather to nonvolatile components of susceptibility and/or resistance. A scenario for host location by the Japanese beetle is presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1295-1305
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Chemical Ecology
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1996

Keywords

  • attractant
  • Coleoptera
  • crabapple
  • linalool
  • Malus spp.
  • Popillia japonica
  • Scarabacidae
  • semiochemical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Biochemistry

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