Volunteers and resource management competencies of nonprofit organizations during challenging times

Jeongyoon Lee, Young Joo Park, Sung eun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nonprofit organizations increasingly compete for limited resources and recognize volunteers as vital assets. That said, which nonprofits are more successful in harnessing volunteers than others and enlisting more volunteers while responding to environmental changes? Guided by the resource-based theory, this study theorizes that a nonprofit's human, social, and financial resource management competencies relate to its volunteer use. Also, applying contingent resource-based theory extends our theoretical arguments as to why a nonprofit needs to develop its resource management competencies for the use of volunteers facing a community's financial hardship. Our zero-inflated negative binomial analysis using the IRS 990 and U.S. Census data (2010–2012) finds that (1) a nonprofit's higher human, social, and financial resource management competencies have an important influence on using volunteers, and (2) a nonprofit having higher financial resource management competencies can use more volunteers when its community experiences economic hardship. These findings pinpoint that volunteer use is not separable from organizational holistic resource management competencies and suggest that turbulent environments can cause a significant shift in the management competencies required for volunteer use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-129
Number of pages23
JournalNonprofit Management and Leadership
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Wiley Periodicals LLC.

Keywords

  • resource management competencies
  • resource-based theory
  • volunteer use
  • zero-inflated negative binomial analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Strategy and Management

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Volunteers and resource management competencies of nonprofit organizations during challenging times'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this