When do socially accepted people feel ostracized? Physical pain triggers social pain

Zhansheng Chen, Kai Tak Poon, C. Nathan DeWall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present research investigated whether physical suffering would cause people to feel ostracized even when they are accepted by their social interaction partners. Participants were instructed to place their hands either into a circulated cold water bath (to induce physical pain) or into a water bath at room temperature while they were either included or ostracized during an online ball tossing game—Cyberball. We found that physical pain led people to experience social pain, while they are socially accepted during a social interaction. Our findings suggest that people with physical suffering may need extra attention in social interactions to satisfy their threatened social needs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68-76
Number of pages9
JournalSocial Influence
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2015

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council’s GRF (grant number HKU742411H, to Chen and DeWall).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014, © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • belonging
  • ostracism
  • physical pain
  • social pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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