When Wearing a Mask Is (Not) the Norm: Political Partisanship and Persuasion in the Context of COVID-19

Zane A. Dayton, Marko Dragojevic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the effects of source partisanship and credentials on persuasion. Democrats and Republicans (N = 206) read a policy statement advocating for a national mask mandate, ostensibly written by either a doctor or layperson, associated either with the Democratic or Republican party. Participants’ perceptions of the source and receptivity to the message aligned with their political party’s normative position on the issue: Democrats rated the source as more competent and trustworthy, engaged in less counterarguing, and supported the policy more than Republicans. Although the doctor was trusted more than the layperson and Republicans (but not Democrats) attributed more trust and competence to an ingroup than an outgroup source, source characteristics had no effect on message receptivity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCommunication Reports
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Western States Communication Association.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • norms
  • Persuasion
  • Social Categorization
  • Social Identity
  • Source Characteristics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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