Young African Americans’ Communication with Family Members About COVID-19: Impact on Vaccination Intention and Implications for Health Communication Interventions

Diane B. Francis, Nia Mason, Aurora Occa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Communication with family members about the COVID-19 vaccine may play an important role in vaccination decisions, especially among young people. This study examined the association between family communication about the COVID-19 vaccine and vaccination intention. Participants were Black/African Americans aged 18–30 years (N = 312) recruited through an online survey in June 2020. We assessed family communication, vaccine attitudes, perceived norms, outcome expectancies, and vaccination intention. More than half (62%) of the participants had talked to family members about the vaccine. Females were more likely than males to have engaged in family communication (63% vs. 59%) (p. >.05). Family communication, injunctive norms, and descriptive norms were significantly (p. <.01) associated with vaccination intention. Family communication was the strongest predictor of intention. Promoting discussions about vaccinations between young Black adults and their families may increase the likelihood of adopting positive vaccination beliefs and influencing vaccine decision-making.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1550-1556
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of racial and ethnic health disparities
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, W. Montague Cobb-NMA Health Institute.

Keywords

  • Black Americans
  • COVID-19
  • Family communication
  • Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Young African Americans’ Communication with Family Members About COVID-19: Impact on Vaccination Intention and Implications for Health Communication Interventions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this